5cents a pound

An archive of inspiration, negotiating the world through artistic intervention

Ian Teh: Confluence (The Strait of Malacca : the crossroads of the world)

Located in the Malaysian waters, the Strait of Malacca is currently the most important sea route of the world, and a decisive crossroads for international trade and cultural exchanges.

This series of photographs documents a journey, for the most part along the short coastline of Selangor, the richest state in Malaysia. It is a contemporary portrait of a state, and in a sense a metaphor for the rest of the country.

On the shore, an hour away from the nation’s glittering capital, are the gritty industrialised shipping terminals of Port Klang and the sleepy, seemingly idyllic rural towns that populate the Selangor waterfront. These images try to offer a nuanced document of what this coastline is today, and perhaps a sense of the significant changes that are ongoing.

Galit Seligmann: Pilgrimage

Artist Statement: The intention of the series Pilgrimage, has been to invert the tourist gaze at two of the most visited sites In the Eastern and Western world: The Taj Mahal in India, and St Peter’s Basilica in Italy. The buildings are described not by their material structure, but rather by the tourists visiting them, and all identifying context has been excluded from these two endlessly reproduced landmarks. As a result of the ease of travel, tourist sites across the world have acquired a sameness about them, and this neutral backdrops symbolise the ubiquity of the modern day tourist trail.

Émilie Régnier: Mali Passport

via foam: ‘I am really driven by the idea of showing a West African society that is growing,’ says Régnier. That means ignoring the easy and the rote: pictures of elites quaffing champagne, or images cataloguing the atrocities of war. Witnessing with a camera takes many forms. For Régnier, photographic truth is located in the bodily presence of young West Africans proudly negotiating their future, a diverse future of many possibilities.’

Tariq Sawyer: Daily life in the Altai Mountains. A Kazakh-Mongolian family tend their livestock through the harsh Mongolian spring.

Bayan-Olgii. Altai Mountains, Mongolia.

A rare portrait of legendary turkish singer Selda, famous in the west for her 70s recordings but who continued a mysterious career in the past decades. After weeks of negotiations, we convinced her to play live and solo for the first time in 10 years. Here’s this little wander on the magnificent Bodrum Peninsula, Mediterranean Sea.

5centsapound:

*reblogging reblogging reblogging people and not just war zones.

MAKE A WISH-GAZA by Loulou d’Aki (2012)

Make a Wish is an investigation about the dreams and visions of a selection of 21st Century youngsters, for youth is the age of all infinite possibilities. The aim of the game is to open up the range of the research around the planet. In the whole picture, each chapter presents individuals in some group or situation, as to throw a light on the articulation between, -on one hand origin, cultural heritage, religion, climate and geographic position -and on the other hand, freedom. *This is the chapter shot in Gaza the days before, during and after Operation Pillar of Defense.

1. View on an open space hit in an Israeli air strike during operation Pillar of defense.

2. Ahmed Zayed, an 18-year old fisherman in the rubbles of what used to be his home in Salateeh area, until it was destroyed in an Israeli air strike a few hours before the truce between Israel and Hamas after the 8-day Operation Pillar of Defense.

3. The stables next to what used to be Yasser Arafat’s headquarters until it was destroyed in 2001 by Israeli helicopter gunships in retaliation for a suicide bombing.

4. Open space struck in an Israeli air strike during 8-day Operation Pillar of Defense.

5. 21-year old Maraam Homed is very active on Twitter; she sees it as a way to communicate to the world what is going on in the Gaza strip. She is the only Gazan to Tweet in french and was recently invited to Paris on a conference trip.

6. Amel Ashgar, 24 studies psychology and sport but would like to go to France and work there where women have more freedom to practice sports.

7. Alaam Abu Ansa, a 19-year old student of Technology and Medical science, stands in front of his garden where a Qasam missile hit ground without exploding this morning in Khan Yonis, southern Gaza strip. 

8. Mahmoud Sarsour, 23 from Tal El-Hawa after Friday prayers. He studies Civil Engineering at the Islamic Universtiy and believes that this is the best time to reach a united Palestinian leadership in order to change the situation.

9. Alah Ahmed Daama attends The Right to Live Society; a special school for Gazans with downs syndrome, established in 1993.

10. Jasmine Nebieh, 24 used to teach Yoga in the stadium before it was destroyed in an Israeli air strike during Operation Pillar of Defense. She studies Sport Psychology and would like to work with children in Spain.

11. 19-year old Abdallah Al-Rhaman works with his brother Ahmed; together they make a living by performing with horses in weddings and ceremonies, just like their father used to do. 

12. Amaha El-Naga, 16 lives with her 7 family members in Khan Yonis buffer zone. The day after Operation Pillar of Defense truce people stroll up unto the border for the first time.

Collective Punishment in Gaza - The New Yorker -

It’s worth listening carefully when Netanyahu speaks to the Israeli people. What is going on in Palestine today is not really about Hamas. It is not about rockets. It is not about “human shields” or terrorism or tunnels. It is about Israel’s permanent control over Palestinian land and Palestinian lives. That is what Netanyahu is really saying, and that is what he now admits he has “always” talked about. It is about an unswerving, decades-long Israeli policy of denying Palestine self-determination, freedom, and sovereignty.

What Israel is doing in Gaza now is collective punishment. It is punishment for Gaza’s refusal to be a docile ghetto. It is punishment for the gall of Palestinians in unifying, and of Hamas and other factions in responding to Israel’s siege and its provocations with resistance, armed or otherwise, after Israel repeatedly reacted to unarmed protest with crushing force. Despite years of ceasefires and truces, the siege of Gaza has never been lifted.

As Netanyahu’s own words show, however, Israel will accept nothing short of the acquiescence of Palestinians to their own subordination. It will accept only a Palestinian “state” that is stripped of all the attributes of a real state: control over security, borders, airspace, maritime limits, contiguity, and, therefore, sovereignty. The twenty-three-year charade of the “peace process” has shown that this is all Israel is offering, with the full approval of Washington. Whenever the Palestinians have resisted that pathetic fate (as any nation would), Israel has punished them for their insolence. This is not new.

[…]

In the past seven or more years, Israel has besieged, tormented, and regularly attacked the Gaza Strip. The pretexts change: they elected Hamas; they refused to be docile; they refused to recognize Israel; they fired rockets; they built tunnels to circumvent the siege; and on and on. But each pretext is a red herring, because the truth of ghettos—what happens when you imprison 1.8 million people in a hundred and forty square miles, about a third of the area of New York City, with no control of borders, almost no access to the sea for fishermen (three out of the twenty kilometres allowed by the Oslo accords), no real way in or out, and with drones buzzing overhead night and day—is that, eventually, the ghetto will fight back. It was true in Soweto and Belfast, and it is true in Gaza. We might not like Hamas or some of its methods, but that is not the same as accepting the proposition that Palestinians should supinely accept the denial of their right to exist as a free people in their ancestral homeland.

This is precisely why the United States’ support of current Israeli policy is folly. Peace was achieved in Northern Ireland and in South Africa because the United States and the world realized that they had to put pressure on the stronger party, holding it accountable and ending its impunity. Northern Ireland and South Africa are far from perfect examples, but it is worth remembering that, to achieve a just outcome, it was necessary for the United States to deal with groups like the Irish Republican Army and the African National Congress, which engaged in guerrilla war and even terrorism. That was the only way to embark on a road toward true peace and reconciliation. The case of Palestine is not fundamentally different.

Instead, the United States puts its thumb on the scales in favor of the stronger party. In this surreal, upside-down vision of the world, it almost seems as if it is the Israelis who are occupied by the Palestinians, and not the other way around. In this skewed universe, the inmates of an open-air prison are besieging a nuclear-armed power with one of the most sophisticated militaries in the world.

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Rashid Khalidi is the Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University and the editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies, and was an adviser to the Palestinian delegation at the Madrid-Washington Palestinian-Israeli negotiations of 1991-93. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Five Latin American countries withdraw envoys from IsraelAugust 1, 2014
The decision of the Latin American countries to recall their ambassadors in Tel Aviv is a “deep disappointment”, says Israel.
El Salvador on Wednesday became the fifth Latin American country to withdraw its ambassador from Israel in protest at Israel’s military offensive in Gaza.
Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Peru have already recalled their ambassadors.
Israeli Foreign Ministry Spokesman Yigal Palmor said that the move encourages Hamas; “this decision encourages Hamas which has been recognized as a terrorist organization by several countries. The countries standing against terror must act responsibly and should not reward them. While Hamas has been responsible for hindering a ceasfire, El Salvador, Peru and Chile were expected to support international attitude for peace and demilitarization of Gaza”, the statement said.
Earlier Israel criticized Brazil over its decision to recall its ambassador in protest at Israel’s military offensive in Gaza.
Brazil was one of 29 countries in the UN Human Rights Council that voted last Wednesday to investigate Israel over its military offensive in Gaza.
During a state visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping on July 17, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said her country was “profoundly concerned by the dramatic events” in Gaza.
The Palestinian death toll from a devastating Israeli onslaught on the Gaza Strip rose to 1283, according to a Gaza Health Ministry spokesman.
According to the spokesman, at least 7170 Palestinians have also been injured in the ongoing Israeli attacks since July 7.
Source

viva Latin America

thepeoplesrecord:

Five Latin American countries withdraw envoys from Israel
August 1, 2014

The decision of the Latin American countries to recall their ambassadors in Tel Aviv is a “deep disappointment”, says Israel.

El Salvador on Wednesday became the fifth Latin American country to withdraw its ambassador from Israel in protest at Israel’s military offensive in Gaza.

Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Peru have already recalled their ambassadors.

Israeli Foreign Ministry Spokesman Yigal Palmor said that the move encourages Hamas; “this decision encourages Hamas which has been recognized as a terrorist organization by several countries. The countries standing against terror must act responsibly and should not reward them. While Hamas has been responsible for hindering a ceasfire, El Salvador, Peru and Chile were expected to support international attitude for peace and demilitarization of Gaza”, the statement said.

Earlier Israel criticized Brazil over its decision to recall its ambassador in protest at Israel’s military offensive in Gaza.

Brazil was one of 29 countries in the UN Human Rights Council that voted last Wednesday to investigate Israel over its military offensive in Gaza.

During a state visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping on July 17, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said her country was “profoundly concerned by the dramatic events” in Gaza.

The Palestinian death toll from a devastating Israeli onslaught on the Gaza Strip rose to 1283, according to a Gaza Health Ministry spokesman.

According to the spokesman, at least 7170 Palestinians have also been injured in the ongoing Israeli attacks since July 7.

Source

viva Latin America